Image courtesy University of Massachusetts.

Interesting Engineering, Jan 23: UMass researchers Trisha Andrew and Linden Allison have come up with a new fabric that can capture energy from body heat to power light wearable devices.

The fabric takes advantage of the “thermoelectric” effect that occurs when the body’s temperature is higher than the ambient air. It has high electrical conductivity along with low thermal conductivity, allowing it to move electrical charges from warmer areas to cooler ones.

“What we have developed is a way to inexpensively vapor-print biocompatible, flexible and lightweight polymer films made of every day, abundant materials onto cotton fabrics that have high enough thermoelectric properties to yield fairly high thermal voltage, enough to power a small device,” said Andrew.

Read the full story.

About Us

intelliFLEX, a not-for-profit industry alliance, is a vital partner for accelerating the growth of the printable, flexible and hybrid electronics sector of more than 300 organizations across Canada. Our technologies add intelligence and connect ordinary objects to enable the Internet of Everything.

We unite our growing global membership to build an effective ecosystem of supply chains for flexible, 3D printable electronics, 2D large area printable electronics, wearable electronics, smart textiles and hybrid electronics including related semiconductors, integrated circuits and software.

Our programs accelerate the adoption of these innovations for Smart Packaging and Retail, Intelligent Buildings and Connected Homes, Aerospace and Defence, Automotive and Industrial Applications, Health and Wellness, Intelligent Documents and Wearables.

3 + 11 =

© 2019 intelliFLEX Innovation Alliance | All rights reserved
Privacy Policy | Terms & Conditions